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SUKABUMI

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Overview

Located on the southern slopes of lush Mt. Gede-Mt. Pangrango National Park in West Java, the district of Sukabumi is cool and scenic and is a favored area for outbound group activities that include camping, mountain trekking, whitewater rafting, to adventurous caving that descends deep underground into dark cavernous domes with stalagtites and stalacmites.


During Dutch colonial days, the town of Sukabumi and its surroundings was the favored place for rich Dutch tea planters because of its beautiful tropical scenery and cool climate. In 1914 the Dutch Colonial government established a Gemeente or municipality in Sukabumi since many wealthy European and Dutch families lived in this region. They were elite members of the Preanger Planters Club, an exclusive society of Dutch tea plantation owners in the western part of Java, headquartered in the Vrier Building at Bandungs Postweg, today known as Jalan Asia Afrika. Tea from this area of Java was at the time, the island’s main export commodity.


To Sukabumi’s south the land slopes down all the way to the Indian Ocean where lies the town of Pelabuhan Ratu, originally a fishing village now a tourist resort.  This area and indeed the entire south coast of Java is believed to be the abode of the mystical and feared Queen of the South Seas, known as Nyi Loro Kidul.


Further west fromPelabuhan Ratu, along the Karanghawu and Cimaja beaches surfers have found a location ideal for surfing the challenging barrels of the Indian Ocean.


Although less known than the Puncak - Cianjur main mountain route from Jakarta to Bandung, the Sukabumi district and town, located some 3 hours drive from Bandung or 4 to hours from Jakarta, is an area truly worth enjoying especially by nature adventure seekers.


(Photo courtesy of Herlan Jaelani).

Activities

To Eat, To Buy, To Stay, To Do

There are plenty of hotels here and some of them are:

Hotel Edelweis

Jl. Suryakencana No. 54

Phone: +62 266 223 191

Hotel Rengganis

Jl. Kenari No. 16-18

Phone: +62 266 221 934

Hotel Anugrah Mandiri

Jl. Bhayangkara No. 194

Phone: +62 266 227 786

Hotel Mustika

Jl. Bhayangkara No. 101

Phone: +62 266 222 287

Hotel Batu Putih

Jl. Bhayangkara No. 73

Phone: +62 266 221 422

Hotel Permata Hijau

Jl.Bhayangkara Sukabumi

Phone: +62 266 222 274

 

Hotel Sukabumi

Jl. Jend. Sudirman No. 82

Phone: +62 266 222 288

Hotel  Juwita

Jl. Veteran Sukabumi

Phone: +62 266 224 877

Hotel Raharja

Jl. Arif Rahman Hakim 56

Phone: +62 266 222 264

Hotel Varista

Jl. Pengadilan No. 8

Phone: +62 266 222 545

Photo Gallery

Getting There and Around

Get Around

From Jakarta, Sukabumi is 120 kilometers away and it takes around 4 hours during the night (as there are less traffic jams in the connecting towns) or 5 hours when there are traffic congestions in Ciawi, Cicurug, Cibadak, and Cisaat area.

From Bandung, it will take you only 3 hours by car at normal speed.  You will pass West Java’s deep gorge at Rajamanadala, a district before entering Cianjur and a walk across the bridge is a thrilling experience.

Buses are available and they run the Jakarta-Sukabumi route or Bandung-Sukabumi route from dusk to dawn.

Angkot is everywhere in Sukabumi. Each color designates different routes. You should try riding one of these angkots. Horse carriages are still seen in several parts, and so are becaks, the trishaws.

Get There

From Jakarta, Sukabumi is 120 kilometers away and it takes around 4 hours during the night (as there are less traffic jams in the connecting towns) or 5 hours when there are traffic congestions in Ciawi, Cicurug, Cibadak, and Cisaat area.

From Bandung, it will take you only 3 hours by car at normal speed.  You will pass West Java’s deep gorge at Rajamanadala, a district before entering Cianjur and a walk across the bridge is a thrilling experience.

Buses are available and they run the Jakarta-Sukabumi route or Bandung-Sukabumi route from dusk to dawn.

Angkot is everywhere in Sukabumi. Each color designates different routes. You should try riding one of these angkots. Horse carriages are still seen in several parts, and so are becaks, the trishaws.